Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for September, 2011

From Dictionary.com:

—adjective

1. friendly; agreeable: a convivial atmosphere.

2. fond of feasting, drinking, and merry company; jovial.

3. of or befitting a feast; festive.

Wordsmith Wednesdays made-up example sentence:

Though peer reviews can be critical, it is also important that they remain a convivial process.

 
View this word on Dictionary.com for pronunciation and additional definitions.

Find out more about Wordsmith Wednesdays.

Read Full Post »

Chicken: delicious, tender, dramatic . . . wait, what?

Maple Leaf’s “Dinnertime Is Prime Time” commercial shows that not only can chicken satisfy your hunger—it can move you. Depicting scenes of close relationships combined with a poetic voice-over and topped off with a poignant piano melody, they’ve created the most moving ad for chicken that you’ll ever see. Don’t believe me?
 


 

The clincher in this ad is really the music, so naturally, I went looking for the artist. First stop: YouTube. Apparently I’m not the only one enamored with the tune—something I realized after watching several videos of people performing their renditions of it on piano.

After finally locating Maple Leaf’s channel on YouTube (that’s right, Maple Leaf has its own YouTube channel) I read that the music was composed specifically for the ad. Kind of a bummer, as I would have liked to hear more of the same.

During my search, though, I had looked into someone’s claim that the music was a trance song called “Make a Miracle”, so I made another quick visit to YouTube. The arpeggios in “Make a Miracle” are played in a different order, but the melodies of the two songs sound oddly similar. And strangely enough, the artist is called Prime Time! Coincidence? Probably.
 


 

In fact, if you listen to a lot of trance, you’ll find similar arrangements all over the place. Most likely because the note pattern in question produces that familiar “moving” feeling.
 

First video: Maple Leaf Foods via the Maple Leaf Foods YouTube Channel
Second video: Primetime via YouTube
 

Apologies to any vegetarians who were offended by my description of chicken as delicious.

Read Full Post »

From Dictionary.com:

—adjective

1. intended for instruction; instructive: didactic poetry.

2. inclined to teach or lecture others too much: a boring, didactic speaker.

3. teaching or intending to teach a moral lesson.

Wordsmith Wednesdays made-up example sentence:

Aesop’s Fables and many old fairy tales are good for children due to their didactic nature.

 
View this word on Dictionary.com for pronunciation and additional definitions.

Find out more about Wordsmith Wednesdays.

Read Full Post »

From Dictionary.com:

—adjective

1. of the nature of or resembling that of sugar: a powdery substance with a saccharine taste.

2. containing or yielding sugar.

3. very sweet to the taste; sugary: a saccharine dessert.

4. cloyingly agreeable or ingratiating: a saccharine personality.

5. exaggeratedly sweet or sentimental: a saccharine smile; a saccharine song of undying love.

Wordsmith Wednesdays made-up example sentence:

Choosing a card at the store can be a bother, especially if you try to avoid the ones containing little saccharine verses.

 
View this word on Dictionary.com for pronunciation and additional definitions.

Find out more about Wordsmith Wednesdays.

Read Full Post »

“Do what you want,” sings Amy Lee in the new Evanescence single—advice that the band members themselves have clearly taken, as fans who are used to the typical Evanescence sound might be thrown off guard.  The single, What You Want, was made available early this August and can be heard on their official site.  The new album, self-titled Evanescence, is scheduled for release on the 11th of October.

The new single is fast for an Evanescence song (at just over 120 bpm).  A run-through of the previous two albums reveals that it’s their fastest song yet, with its brisk pulse heightening its intensity and making it more energetic.  Conversely, it becomes less dramatic—a quality which in the past has been a staple of the band’s music.

Evanescence at Le Zénith in Paris

Although some of the newest band members have been around for a while, this will be the first album to feature Troy McLawhorn (guitar), Tim McCord (bass), and Will Hunt (drums).  The lineup alterations were interspersed throughout the last few years, but the new guys seem to form a perfectly capable troupe.

Evanescence has definitely kept its roots in the obscure area between rock and metal sticking with a dark and somewhat heavy sound, but had it not been for Amy Lee’s distinctive voice I probably wouldn’t have been able to recognize the music on its own.  Remove her from the mix and it almost approaches industrial metal at some points (although industrial fans might get on my case for that comment).  The change is not a bad thing, though.  When a band releases new material that sounds different from everything else they’ve done, it shows that they can evolve and that they aren’t afraid to tread on new musical ground.  Instead of looking backward trying to imitate their previous successes, they’ve got their minds on the future and are trying out new ideas.  It’s a refreshing methodology and I can think of a few other bands that could benefit from it.

Some fans might not agree that the changes are all positive, complaining that “this is not Evanescence”, but those are probably the type of people who like listening to the same old tunes over and over—the type of people void of any thirst for new and creative music.  Granted, we’ve only heard one new song so far, but if What You Want is any indication of how the rest of the album is going to sound, I’m looking forward to hearing it.

 
Photo: Jacquelin Corrales via Wikimedia Commons under CC BY-SA 2.5

Read Full Post »

From Dictionary.com:

—adverb

1. piece by piece; one piece at a time; gradually: to work piecemeal.

2. into pieces or fragments: to tear a letter piecemeal.

Wordsmith Wednesdays made-up example sentence:

We cut and split the logs piecemeal, and by the end of the afternoon had a full cord of firewood stacked.  (Did I just satisfy both definitions with one sentence?)

 
View this word on Dictionary.com for pronunciation and additional definitions.

Find out more about Wordsmith Wednesdays.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: