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Archive for July, 2011

The moon was the subject for Sonia’s writing challenge this month. I sure hope “moonlight” counts. Roll film! Er . . . story.

Update 2012/05/23:
Apologies, but due to the subsequent editing of this short story, I have removed it from the blog indefinitely.

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From Dictionary.com:

—verb (used with object)

1. to pursue or direct (one’s way).

—verb (used without object)

2. to proceed or go.

Wordsmith Wednesdays made-up example sentence:

We had to wend through the crowds of the bazaar to reach the city proper.

 
View this word on Dictionary.com for pronunciation and additional definitions.

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People have been saying it for a while. The film and music industries have not crumbled due to piracy. They continue to flourish.

An interesting article on Geek.com talks about a report that was created by research company GfK Group for an undisclosed client. The report was initially intended to further the negative view of media pirates but, in fact, showed that pirates are generally better customers than their straight-and-narrow cousins.

The gist (although I encourage any readers to check out the original article) is that movie pirates don’t just download. They spend a lot on DVDs, Blu-rays and cinema tickets. Likewise, music pirates spend money on music because they like music.

From the article:

The conclusion of the study is that movie pirates are generally more interested in film and therefore spend more money and invest more time in it. In other words, they make up some of the movie industries best customers.

This makes perfect sense to me. If a person downloads a certain form of media, it’s probably because they’re keen on it. I’d be lying if I said I haven’t downloaded a few movies and television shows, but I also consider my hard copy DVD collection to be quite large and my cinema attendances common.

Now, the question is . . . who commissioned the report. I think we all have a pretty good idea.

Also from the article:

The reason given for shelving [the report] was that the contents proved “unpleasant.”

 
Original article: Geek.com

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From Dictionary.com:

—noun

1. a person who forsakes his religion, cause, party, etc.

Wordsmith Wednesdays made-up example sentence:

He knew that turning his back on his brotherhood would be risky, since they hunted down all apostates.

 
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This blog uses the MistyLook theme.  You may have noticed (either here or on your own MistyLook blog) that when images are posted, they are automatically given a sort of “shadow” under the bottom and right edges.

I can’t speak for everyone, but I don’t like having the shadow placed under my images by default.  Here’s how you can go about removing it.  This solution is a bit of a kludge, so it’s up to you whether or not you want to use it.  Also, keep in mind that this information has only been tested on the MistyLook theme, even though there may be other themes that put effects on images, in which cases a similar solution could work.  Here we go.

 
This is what you normally get when you insert an image.

Late Tulip
As you can see, there’s a shadow under the bottom and right edges.  This link will show you the background image that the theme uses to create the shadow effect.  It gets placed underneath each image after being resized accordingly. One way to avoid the shadow border is to use the caption feature that’s built into WordPress.  A captioned image will turn out like this:

Late Tulip

Late Tulip

 
However, you may not always want (or need) captions.  Sometimes you might just want a plain image.  To achieve this you can use the HTML tab of the Edit Post screen.

Edit Post Screenshot (small)Be aware: Sometimes, returning to the Visual tab after using the HTML tab can cause certain changes to be lost—non-breaking spaces, for example. For more on this issue, see the note at the end of this post.

 
In the HTML tab, you’ll see your image tag (which is sometimes surrounded by a link tag):

<img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-602" title="Late Tulip" src="https://walkingthepattern.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/stargrass.jpg&quot; alt="Late Tulip" width="170" height="210" />

 
To remove the shadow border, we have to override the image style that has been specified by the theme.  To do this, add the following line after “img” in your image tag.

style="background:#fff; border:none; border-top:0; border-left:0; padding:0;"

 
You should end up with an image tag that looks something like this (the added line is in red):

<img style="background:#fff; border:none; border-top:0; border-left:0; padding:0;" class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-602" title="Late Tulip" src="https://walkingthepattern.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/stargrass.jpg&quot; alt="Late Tulip" width="170" height="210" />

 
Now if you preview your post, your image should look nice and clean-cut, like so:

Late Tulip

 
Basically, we have forced the image to ignore the theme’s style by specifying our own. If you find that your images are being displayed too close to your text, you can substitute your own values for the borders and padding, which are now set to zero. This will give your image a little more breathing room.

 

Note on the Visual and HTML tabs

If, before using the HTML tab, you’re worried about messing something up, I suggest taking advantage of the Save Draft, and Revisions features. You can access the revisions (which act sort of like restore points) by clicking on Screen Options near the top of the Edit Post page, then checking off the box labeled “Revisions”. You should then see the Revisions section at the bottom of the page, which allows you to restore a previously saved version of your post should you ever make a mistake.

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From Dictionary.com:

—adjective

1. of an unnatural or sickly pallor; pallid; lacking color: His wan face suddenly flushed.

2. showing or suggesting ill health, fatigue, unhappiness, etc.: a wan look; a wan smile.

3. lacking in forcefulness, competence, or effectiveness: their wan attempts to organize the alumni.

Wordsmith Wednesdays made-up example sentence:

Now fighting fit, the stray had been wan and lethargic when they first took it in.

 
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From Dictionary.com:

—adjective

1. hanging loosely or in disorder; unkempt: disheveled hair.

2. untidy; disarranged: a disheveled appearance.

Wordsmith Wednesdays made-up example sentence:

Peering through the window of the old fishing shed, they could see bundles of worn rods standing in the corners, dusty bait buckets stacked all over the floor, and dishevelled nets hanging from bent nails.

 
View this word on Dictionary.com for pronunciation and additional definitions.

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